THE
PATINAS

THE
PATINAS

In the logic that inspires the creativity of our company, to characterize its style in a unique way, the patinas represent the distinctive element. Each of our artifacts, each of our creations has a lived, unique and unrepeatable patina. Wood and iron are treated with respect, worked with ancient artisan techniques while preserving the original methods of the past. The final result leads to unmistakably recognizable and identifiable objects as “Doors of the Past”. Here are some examples. Our waxes are natural; beeswaxes heated and passed on the surface with the right dexterity. The colors are all natural, composed by us and also calibrated. In lacquering, the plastering, gilding on bolus and meccatura phase are performed on consistent bases and with many processing steps; in this way the lacquering or pickling are substantial and full-bodied. The aging techniques require many steps and, above all, they start from the basic conception that an ancient aspect of the surface comes from a painstaking work starting from the base of the process (that is to say from the plastering, in the case of lacquers and from the cleaning, in case of of ancient natural woods). Respect for ancient woods is central and fundamental. Cleaning is allowed as long as it does not lead to alteration of the surfaces, which in fact should show even more the lived-in aspect that the passage of time has given through it. The ancient construction techniques, such as joints, turned nails and testaroli help to give the product an even more experienced and special final patina. An excellent patina will make an object more lovable for those who love the artisan culture of wood. It is not a question of copies, but of conservation and re-evaluation of the aesthetic and functional qualities of the past, in order to keep alive the concept of the unique and unrepeatable work of the artefact.

THE
TASSELS

THE
TASSELS

To make our furniture and doors even more precious, we can apply tassels made by skilled artisan hands. The tassel was already used in the late 1500s to adorn curtains, fabrics and cushions and make them even more beautiful and refined. Over time they have also found application in other areas as real furnishing accessories. Even today, as in the past, the most precious tassels are sewn by hand using ancient fabrics mostly of Italian and French origin. Thus, the finest velvets, linen and silks are assembled with trimmings, cords, beads and sometimes ancient fragments of wooden friezes, paying particular attention to the use of colors, to create real works of art. The shapes are of the most varied, generally hanging with threads and cords of various lengths that fall softly downwards; but also round, square shapes or shapes vaguely reminiscent of flowers or the dresses of 19th century ladies. The choice of tassels is anything but simple and banal. It is a small ornamental object, but with great importance in completing and confirming a style or in giving more elegance. It is important that the colors match perfectly with those of the furniture or door in which we want to apply it. We must also keep in mind the style of the room and furnishings to create a perfect stylistic and chromatic coherence. Porte del Passato realizes original and exclusive tassels also at the request of its customers who can choose colors, shapes and materials to their taste. The precious antique fabrics of French and Florentine origin are often applied to antique brass and iron objects or old gilded leaf fragments that already tell their own story and that can therefore only increase the charm and flavor of these ornaments and the furniture on which they will come. used.

SHAKER
STYLE

SHAKER
STYLE

Essentiality as an act of faith The Shaker style takes its name from the so-called “Shaking Quakers”, in fact the proselytes of this large religious community, which spread from 1774 in Massachusetts (USA) and grew in the following decades especially in the American states of New England, during religious ceremonies they used to dance, waving their hands and feet, to cleanse themselves of sins and negative influences. At the base of the Shaker philosophy of life were: the value of collectivity, common property, celibacy, peace, gender equality. The Shakers, inspired by these principles, established an absolute identity between the form and function of things, guided by an aesthetic concept that makes beauty reside only in utility. This is why they anticipated the theories of modern design by more than a century by eliminating any non-functional element from the furnishings and objects they built, creating a unique style characterized by essentiality. From this “sectarian” origin, the Shaker style has spread, conquering the taste of Americans first and then of the world, but retaining its distinctive features in the simplicity of the lines that shape wood, the favorite raw material and divine gift. The feeling that even today a pure Shaker style furniture transmits is that of cleanliness, perfection, order, extreme functionality and practicality. The home environment in which this style finds its natural attitude and certainly the kitchen, where the Shaker dictate that every object must have and keep its exact place, finds the most obvious application. With an austere but warmly welcoming beauty, the Shaker-style kitchen has never been more appreciated than today, in the whole world. The natural finish woods of the first Shaker furniture have left space, or are well combined, with more or less full-bodied lacquers, ranging from lighter shades of whites and pastel colors to decidedly stronger and darker shades. The lines of the doors on the capacious shelves are simple, linear, hinting in the many timid variations that embellish a slightly richer Shaker, but without forgetting its puritanical character.
The extremely versatile modularity of the Shaker-style artisanal kitchen allows you to make the most of the space available in an environment, which can be optimized by placing it in contact and overlapping in continuity solutions between the various hanging container elements. The choice and introduction of many characteristic accessories of the artisan Country Kitchen such as plate racks, coppersmiths, shelves is greatly facilitated by the aesthetic ductility of the Shaker lines, which allows even usually only structural elements such as hoods and lowered columns to be contained. The innate simplicity of the Shaker design also makes it extremely suitable for combinations with many other styles of furniture, making possible infinite combinations of sure aesthetic impact. All this is combined with a great pleasure of use and an atmosphere of undoubted welcome.

GUSTAVIAN
STYLE

GUSTAVIAN
STYLE

The elegance of light

The history of Gustavian-style furniture began when the future king of Sweden, Gustav III, returned to his homeland after a long stay in France at the court of King Louis XVI in Versailles. During that period the Swedish monarch was fascinated by the Neoclassical style in great vogue at the French court, so much so that he wanted to recreate it inside the palaces of Sweden. In particular, this happy royal whim produced an exquisite blend halfway between the Neoclassical and French Rococò furnishing styles, but lightened by excesses and remodeled on new canons, cleaner and suited to the sober Nordic style. The style then first spread to the royal palaces of Drottningholm and Gripsholm, but soon conquered the tastes of the bourgeoisie, furnishing the country cottages with more rustic and homely declinations. While in the courts the Gustavian furnishings were embellished with gilding, in the country houses they were simply painted in opaque white, cream or gray. These very light color finishes gave light to the rooms, an important feature in the long winter darkness. This popular and sometimes rural evolution of the features of the Gustaviano further characterized the structural and chromatic canons of the style, the same ones that still confer, even today, a light and luminous elegance to its candid austerity. Opaque patinas of wood painted with an almost powdered whiteness dress the sculpted legs of tables, chairs, sofas, rosettes, large mirrors, chandeliers with five or seven arms of candelabra, sconces with candles. Furniture of all kinds: wardrobes, chests of drawers, dressing tables, bedside tables, secretaire, sideboards, cabinets, display cabinets and doors are dressed in delicate inlaid decorations. These are often linked to elegant vertical cane motifs, on various geometries of rectangles or rhombuses combined with delicate carvings that make precious relief on doors and drawers. Fine shoes, often painted in pale uniformity with opaque woods, are expertly worked in harmony with the classicism of the origins of this style. All this is emphasized on the clear smooth surfaces of the Gustavian furnishings which, slender and generous, bounce a light capable of harmonizing the entire environment in an incomparable, muffled and absolutely welcoming atmosphere.

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